News archive

Dole begins payments to Central American banana workers 18.09.2012
U.S. fruit giant Dole Food Company, Inc. this week began paying a settlement to some 5,000 former Central American banana workers who sued the company for exposing them to the harmful pesticides Nemagon and Fumazone while they worked for the company.The agreement terminates 38 lawsuits filed in the United States and Nicaragua alleging pesticide-related injuries, the company said.The complaints concerned pesticides sprayed on crops to control worms for over two decades, before they were banned in 1977 following reports of infertility among male workers exposed to them.The terminated lawsuits...
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Ecuador: Wave of union-busting by banana companies 17.09.2012
In the last few weeks in the Provinces of Los Rios and Guayas, five new trade unions have been broken up in plantations belonging to national and international banana companies. A total of 159 workers have been fired. It would appear that all were unfairly dismissed for the simple fact that they wanted to form or join a union. The National Federation of  Free Agroindustrial Workers, Peasant Farmers and Indigenous People  of Ecuador (FENACLE) has been supporting the establishment of these unions and sees in the wave of union-busting and armed evictions a concerted policy by a sector within the...
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“Pineapple Republic” 17.09.2012
The pineapple industry and the Government owe Costa Rican society explanations No other activity is as profitable as pineapple production – mining the soil, worker exploitation and pollution.  It generated $743 million in sales in 2011 and employs 20,000 people.  The question which must be asked is: where does this wealth go? How much tax is paid, and who is bearing the impacts and indirect consequences? Where does the wealth go?  For every Euro paid in Europe in buying pineapples, plantation workers receive only 4 cents, whilst traders, plantation owners and multinationals take the...
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Costa Rica: Labour reforms approved in Parliament 17.09.2012
San José, 13th September: The Costa Rican Parliament today approved a large package of labour law reforms. Some hail the almost unanimous vote as the most significant advances in justice for workers since the Labour Code was created 60 years ago. The package of reforms will speed up conflict resolution processes in the country's legal system, strengthen collective bargaining rights in the public sector and improve some trade union rights.  Highly controversial clauses that would have enshrined in law the role of so-called 'permanent workers' committees' and the 'direct settlements' they sign...
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Guatemala: dawn of a new banana age? 04.09.2012
Could it be that, as we approach the end of seven thousand years of the now-famous Mayan calendar, a new age of dialogue and good industrial relations could be under construction in an industry and a country plagued by decades of conflict and violence? The Guatemalan banana industry, born in the early years of the 20th century to supply the markets of the cities of the South and East Coast of the United States, entered the 21st century in a phase of rapid expansion. Since 2007, the country has overtaken Central and South American exporters to become the USA's single largest source of bananas...
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New industrial union created in Honduras 04.09.2012
El Progreso, Honduras, 4th September 2012Our Honduran partners, COSIBAH (the Honduran Agroindustrial Workers' Union Coordinating Body), have announced the creation of a new trade union at three plantations, Finca Las Tres Hermanas. The plantation is owned by Honduran capital and sells all its fruit from 425 hectares to Chiquita, employing 400 workers.What makes the Sindicato de Trabajadores de la Industria del Banano (Sitrainba) unusual is that, as an industrial union, it can recruit members from any other plantations in the country. It is also not restricted to workers with permanent...
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Labour inspectorates - the reality in Honduras 15.08.2012
SAN PEDRO SULA, Honduras — If you’ve ever wondered why conditions for legions of Latin American workers are so bad, it helps to spend time with the front-line officials keeping tabs on abusive employers.Government labor inspectors take on cases like union-busting and unlawful firings. But across Latin America, labor inspectors are often overburdened with massive case loads, poorly paid and impotent to do very much when they spot exploitation. “This is by design,” said Dan Kovalik, a lawyer for the United Steelworkers which works closely with Latin American labor unions. “These are countries...
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IUF Latin America and COLSIBA agree to coordinate policies and actions 03.08.2012
3rd August, San Pedro Sula, HondurasThe Political Committee of the Coordinating Body of Latin American Banana and Agroindustrial Workers Unions (COLSIBA) met in San Pedro Sula on 1st, 2nd  and 3rd August.  On Friday 3rd, Gerardo Iglesias, IUF Regional Secretary and Carlos H. Reyes, member of the IUF Latin American Executive Committee, participated in the meeting.In his opening speech, Gilbert Bermúdez Umaña, sub-coordinator of COLSIBA, reminded those assembled that “In August last year, together with Gerardo (Iglesias), we had the opportunity to introduce the Forum for Corporate Social...
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Ecologist reports on poverty in the Peruvian mango industry 23.07.2012
Poverty wages, forced and unpaid overtime, poor safety conditions, obstruction to free associations and discrimination against pregnant workers -- these were just some of the accusations that have been levelled against the largest mango production companies in Peru, in a report produced by SOMO (the Dutch Centre for Research on Multinational Corporations) last year. A year has passed since then and it would seem nothing – from either side of the argument – has really changed. You might think working conditions in the Peruvian mango industry have little relevance to your own life, but if you...
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International conference on CSR 19.07.2012
An international conference 'Towards corporate social responsibility along supply chains' - Why and how companies should behave responsibly along their supply chains: the case study of tropical fruits will take place on the 16th of October in Prague. This conference, being held on the eve of the International Day for the Eradiction of the Poverty, is aimed at civil society organisations from the EU new member states, corporate actors, the public sector, academics and policy makers. 
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